book review, giveaway, Uncategorized

What happens when there’s a Murder in the City of Liberty?

About the Book

Book: Murder in the City of Liberty

Author: Rachel McMillan

Genre: Christian Fiction, Historical

Release Date: May 21, 2019

Murder in the City of Liberty Cover

Hamish DeLuca and Regina “Reggie” Van Buren have a new case—and this one brings the war in Europe dangerously close to home.

Determined to make a life for herself, Regina “Reggie” Van Buren bid goodbye to fine china and the man her parents expected her to marry and escaped to Boston. What she never expected to discover was that an unknown talent for sleuthing would develop into a business partnership with the handsome, yet shy, Hamish DeLuca.

Their latest case arrives when Errol Parker, the leading base stealer in the Boston farm leagues, hires Hamish and Reggie to investigate what the Boston police shove off as a series of harmless pranks. Errol believes these are hate crimes linked to the outbreak of war in Europe, and he’s afraid for his life. Hamish and Reggie quickly find themselves in the midst of an escalating series of crimes that seem to link Boston to Hamish’s hometown of Toronto.

When an act of violence hits too close to home, Hamish is driven to a decision that may sever him from Reggie forever . . . even more than her engagement to wealthy architect Vaughan Vanderlaan.

Click here to purchase your copy.

Book Review:

Where’s the lukewarm button? I’m on the fence here, and I need something to push me one way or the other. I liked the book, but not in the oh-my-goodness-leave-me-alone-so-I-can-finish-reading type of way. It was fun, quirky, and rich with history. It just didn’t grab me and refuse to let go.

That doesn’t mean it’s a bad book. Far from it. The writing style is marvelous. Hamish’s tics and quirks gave a different twist to his character and made Reggie’s character more likable when she tried to help Hamish. They both have their flaws. Reggie fled the socialite life and opened a detective operation with Hamish. But she’s still being courted by a wealthy man and has to decide between him and Hamish. I had true levels of worry about her decision-making skills for a while.

Hamish is a lovable blend of grit and anxiety. He’s there when you need him but falls apart sometimes.

Now, since I’ve not read book one, I was a bit worried I’d be confused by jumping straight into book two. I believe Rachel McMillan covered her bases and blended the lines well enough that you can enjoy Murder in the City of Liberty on its own, but I’d recommend you read Murder at the Flamingo first.

What I really found lacking was the spiritual aspect. It was so thin as to be non-existent. Maybe this will improve as the series continues? Either way, I wish it had been stronger.

All in all, I enjoyed the book and would recommend it for lovers of historical mystery and romance. Will I continue reading the series? Probably. I’m curious to see what trouble Reggie and Hamish might find themselves inadvertently falling into in the future.

I’m giving four stars because the writing style, character arc, and romance/mystery aspect were solid. Just because I didn’t fall head over heels doesn’t mean the book isn’t worthy of notable stars.

I requested a copy of this book from Celebrate Lit. I was not required to leave a positive review. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

About the Author

McMillan RachelRachel McMillan is a keen history enthusiast and a lifelong bibliophile. When not writing or reading, she can most often be found drinking tea and watching British miniseries. Rachel lives in bustling Toronto, where she works in educational publishing and pursues her passion for art, literature, music, and theater.

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